RSS

Steve Wozniak speaks out about Steve Jobs


An interesting conversation took place on Google Plus this week.  Steve Wozniak talks about the new movie “Jobs” and provides some rare insight into Jobs and Apple’s history.
If you’d like to join the conversation and view his comments “in context” of the conversation flow, you can read the entire stream on Carms Perez’s G+ page. The following are Steve Wozniak’s comments in the conversation.
———————————————————————————
 Steve Wozniak

Aug 19, 2013

 
Actually, the movie was largely a lie about me. I was an engineer at HP designing the iPhone 5 of the time, their scientific calculators. I had many friends and a good reputation there. I designed things for people all over the country, for fun, all the time too, including the first hotel movie systems and SMPTE time code readers for the commercial video world. Also home pinball games. Among these things, the Apple I was the FIFTH time that something I had created (not built from someone else’s schematic) was turned into money by Jobs. My Pong game got him his job at Atari but he never was an engineer or programmer. I was a regular member at the Homebrew Computer Club from day one and Jobs didn’t know it existed. He was up in Oregon then. I’d take my designs to the meetings and demonstrate them and I had a big following. I wasn’t some guy nobody talked to, although I was shy in social settings. i gave that computer design away for free to help people who were espousing the thoughts about computers changing life in so many regards (communication, education, productivity, etc.). I was inspired by Stanford intellectuals like Jim Warren talking this way at the club. Lee Felsenstein wanted computers to help in things like the antiwar marches he’d orchestrated in Oakland and I was inspired by the fact that these machines could help stop wars. Others in the club had working models of this computer before Jobs knew it existed. He came down one week and I took him to show him the club, not the reverse. He saw it as a businessman. It as I who told Jobs the good things these machines could do for humanity, not the reverse. I begged Steve that we donate the first Apple I to a woman who took computers into elementary schools but he made my buy it and donate it myself.

When I first met Jobs, I had EVERY Dylan album. I was a hardcore fan. I had bootlegs too. Jobs knew a few popular Dylan songs and related to the phrase “when you ain’t got nothin’ you got nothing to lose.” I showed Jobs all my liner notes and lyrics and took him to record stores near San Jose State and Berkeley to buy Dylan bootlegs. I showed him brochures full of Dylan quotes and articles and photos. I brought Jobs into this Dylan world in a big way. I would go to the right post office at midnight, in Oakland, to buy tickets to a Dylan concert and would take Jobs with me. Jobs asked early on in our friendship whether Dylan or the Beatles were better. I had no Beatles album. We both concurred that Dylan was more important because he said important things and thoughtful things. So a Beatles fan was kind of a pop lamb to us. Why would they portray us in the movie as Dylan for Jobs and Beatles for me?

And when Jobs (in the movie, but really a board does this) denied stock to the early garage team (some not even shown) I’m surprised that they chose not to show me giving about $10M of my own stock to them because it was the right thing. And $10M was a lot in that time.

Also, note that the movie showed a time frame in which every computer Jobs developed was a failure. And they had millions of dollars behind them. My Apple ][ was developed on nothing and productized on very little. Yet it was the only revenue and profit source of the company for the first 10 years, well past the point that Jobs had left. The movie made it seem that board members didn’t acknowledge Jobs’ great work on Macintosh but when sales fall to a few hundred a month and the stock dives to 50% in a short time, someone has to save the company. The proper course was to work every angle possible, engineering and marketing, to make the Macintosh marketable while the Apple ][ still supported us for years. This work was done by Sculley and others and it involved opening the Macintosh up too.

The movie shows Steve’s driving of the Macintosh team but not the stuff that most of the team said they’d never again work for him. It doesn’t show his disdain and attempts to kill the Apple ][, our revenue source, so that the Macintosh wouldn’t have to compete with it. The movie audience would want to see a complete picture and they can often tell when they are being shortchanged.

And ease of computer came to the world more than anything from Jef Raskin, in many ways and long before Jef told us to look into Xerox. Jef was badly portrayed.

And if you think that our investor and equal stock holder and mentor Mike Markkula was Jobs’ stooge (and not in control of everything), well, you have been duped.

Jobs mannerisms and phrases are motivational and you need a driver to move things along. But it’s also important to have the skills to execute and create products that will be popular enough to sell for more than it costs to make them. Jobs didn’t have that success at Apple until the iPod, although OS X deserves the credit too. These sorts of things people would have wanted to see, about Jobs or about Apple, but the movie gives other images of what was behind it all and none add up.

———————————————————–
 Steve Wozniak

Jan 19, 2014
Thank you so much for your dear expression.

The real thing everyone can agree on is that we are all thankful for Apple, what it means as well as the great products. What a journey.

————————————————————–
Jan 19, 2014

 
I enjoyed “Pirates” more.

Josh Gad wanted the Jobs movie to include my giving stock to early garage members (about $20M of today’s dollars) after the company gave them none. They might also have shown how I sold a ton of my own pre-IPO stock to employees so that another 40-80 of them could benefit from our IPO. Each of them got about a house out of it.

————————————————————–
Jan 20, 2014

 
Actually, Jobs was not fired. He could have been well funded to develop any product, even something like the NeXT, right at Apple. He was removed from running Macintosh because he had no good constructive ideas that were needed to save the company. He felt that some small adjustments in pricing, and diverting funds from our revenue source, the Apple ][, would make the Macintosh an instant success. The Macintosh was great and was the future in the eyes of those who displaced Jobs. But it was time to be adult and realistic. Hard work to build a Macintosh market would be needed. I’m sad too that the Macintosh wouldn’t sell just on its own.

Jobs decided to leave, telling me that he felt his life was about making computers and that he couldn’t do it at Apple. In the end, his life was about using computer technology for consumer products, even today’s smart phones. He actually had a string of failures trying to develop the next computer. It’s possible that he really left out of spite, wanting to challenge Apple, or out of embarrassment over the Macintosh failure in the market.

Still, he had plenty of wealth that came all from the Apple ][ to invest in NeXT and Pixar and that gave him the chance to mature as an executive.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 23, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , ,

Link

WomenPlayBall.com

I had a chance meeting recently while in Barnes & Nobel at the Mall of America.  I was enjoying time with my family, along with a mocha in the Starbucks café, when the guy next to us struck up a conversation.  Turns out he was a recent college grad turned entrepreneurial blogger and journalist for women’s sports.  He has a really nice website, chock full of interesting and up-to-date articles covering various sports, scores, interviews, and articles about women’s sports.  

Edward Helb is an enterprising young man trying to fill a gap in covering women’s sports.  Please check out his blog and twitter posts @EdwardHelb.

it was great meeting you Edward!  I look forward to seeing where you go with everything! 

Visit his site at

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 27, 2013 in Start Ups

 

Tags: ,

The New Dynamics of Competition; Redefining Competition: From Five Forces to One; From Value Chain to Value Network


The Analytics Age is changing Strategy. Porter’s 5 Forces are considered irrelevant….

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 6, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

TDWI Minneapolis Event: Data Mining and Social Media


I wanted everyone to know that there’s an interesting TDWI meeting coming up on June 11th.  Here’re the details directly from the TDWI website of the Minneapolis Chapter (http://tdwichapters.org/blogs/minneapolis/list/home.aspx):

TDWI Chapters: Minneapolis

The purpose of the Minneapolis Chapter of The Data Warehousing Institute (TDWI) is to enable local BI/DW professionals to:

  • Meet regularly with each other on a regional basis
  • Share best practices in a small group setting
  • Establish a strong network of peers
  • Gain technical advice and career direction

Everyone is welcome. We encourage you to join TDWI, but you do not need to be a member to attend.

You may browse previous events using the page buttons at the bottom of the page.

 

Data Mining and Social Media

Dear Minneapolis and St. Paul Area Business Intelligence Professionals,
Are you curious about the correlation between social media channels and advertising effectiveness? If so, we cordially invite you to attend the upcoming TDWI Minneapolis Chapter meeting on June 11, 2013.

The theme of the June meeting is Data Mining & Social Media. The meeting features local executive, William Stentz, Director Marketing Analytics from Carmichael Lynch.

This is a great topic for anyone in the Business Intelligence market who wishes to learn more about Social Media and Data Analytics.

Join us as we explore this forward-looking topic.

Learn, meet other local professionals, swap business cards, share ideas, and exchange technical and career advice while listening to a quality presentation in a vendor-neutral setting, which is the hallmark of TDWI education. Our meeting agenda is below.

ATTENTION: All Business Intelligence Professionals in the Minneapolis & St. Paul Area

Dear Minneapolis and St. Paul Area Business Intelligence Professionals,
Are you curious about the correlation between social media channels and advertising effectiveness?   If so, we cordially invite you to attend the upcoming TDWI Minneapolis Chapter meeting on June 11th, 2013.

The theme of the March meeting is Data Mining & Social Media.  The meeting features local executive, William Stentz, Director Marketing Analytics from Carmichael Lynch.

This is a great topic for anyone in the Business Intelligence market who wishes to learn more about Social Media and Data Analytics.

Join us as we explore this forward-looking topic.

Learn, meet other local professionals, swap business cards, share ideas, and exchange technical and career advice while listening to a quality presentation in a vendor-neutral setting, which is the hallmark of TDWI education. Our meeting agenda is below.

 

When: Tuesday, June 11th, 2013, 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Where: St. Thomas University

Minneapolis Campus
1000 LaSalle Avenue
Minneapolis , Minnesota 55403
Room : MOH 201 (Minneapolis Opus Hall)
Parking: Best parking is to enter the parking garage from Hennepin on the corner of Hennepin and 10th St.
Take the elevators from the parking garage and enter the UST building and the room is right there.

Directions please click here.

We are pleased that the St Thomas will host our June meeting.  Preregistration will facilitate your entry to the meeting.

DON’T MISS THIS EVENT! Please RSVP below
Click here to register for the next upcoming event

8:00 – 8:30 a.m. Networking and Registration
8:30 – 8:45 a.m. Introduction and Chapter Business
8:45 – 9:30 a.m. Data Mining Social Media, William Stentz
  Speaker Bio: William Stentz is the Director Marketing Analytics at Carmichael Lynch. He is a graduate of Michigan State University where he received a BA in Advertising.  William has twelve years of experience from developing brand strategies for great companies in the automotive industry to building the analytics storyline to help Carmichael Lynch better manage, pull insights from, and present data to further their business.
9:30 – 10:0 a.m. Break and Networking
10:00 – 11:00 a.m. Data Mining Social Media – William Stentz Part II
11:00 – 11:30 a.m. Q&A – discussion
11:30 – 12:45 p.m. Closing Comments & Wrap-Up

DON’T MISS THIS EVENT! Please RSVP below
Click here to register for the next upcoming event
Space is limited so sign up early! To become a member at a 10% discount, please click here and use priority code mincpt1. For more information about TDWI Membership, contact chapters@tdwi.org.
To contact a Chapter officer, click on name of the officer located on the top right hand column of this page.
Follow Minneapolis chapter meeting notices on Twitter: @TDWIMpls  or visit our local web site at   www.tdwimpls.org

William Stentz Bio

William Stentz is the Director Marketing Analytics at Carmichael Lynch. He is a graduate of Michigan State University where he received a BA in Advertising.  William has twelve years of experience from developing brand strategies for great companies in the automotive industry to building the analytics storyline to help Carmichael Lynch better manage, pull insights from, and present data to further their business.

 
 

Tags: , , , ,

Word Press App for Windows Phone 8


I just got the win phone 8 app for Word Press. Seems to be a nice app. It even sends comment alerts to your live tile, if you pin it to your start screen.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on April 26, 2013 in Uncategorized

 
Link

Windows Phone Dev Center – Windows 8 Phone SDK Now Available

If you’ve been waiting for the Windows 8 Phone SDK, your wait is finally over. Visit the Windows Phone Dev Center to get started.

Also, Microsoft has temporarily lowered the cost to create a Microsoft Store account to $8.00 down from $99. If you’re at all interested in doing Windows Store apps for Windows 8, Windows 8 RT, or Windows 8 Phone, now is the time to get started!

Enjoy, and let me know if you’re doing any cool apps. I’d love to collaborate and share.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 30, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

Microsoft Surface is a Game Changer


I was excited to get my Microsoft Surface Tablet on Friday because I thought the device was really special.  What I didn’t expect was for it to change how I interacted with technology.  The Microsoft Surface with Windows 8 is not simply a tablet it’s a new type of personal computing experience.  The more I use my Surface, the more I realize how much of a game changer it is.

The Surface isn’t the first tablet I’ve owned.  My first tablet was the Motorola Xoom followed by the Samsung Galaxy Tab, both running the Android OS.  I also have an Apple iPad 2, that makes the Surface my 4th tablet.  I expected it to be similar to all the other tablets I own.  It isn’t.  In fact, the Surface is not even a tablet at all.  Well, the concept is a tablet, but the Surface…it’s a PC…and a tablet.

I’ve been using Windows 8 Pro for about 6 weeks, since the final build was released to Microsoft Partners.  I have been fairly impressed with its performance, and with the features on my touch screen laptop, but I just didn’t realize the power of Windows 8 until I experienced it on the Microsoft Surface Tablet PC.

For those of you who haven’t purchased a Microsoft Surface Tablet yet, let me walk you through my 2 day experience.  The first impression of the Surface comes through in the packaging.  If you appreciate the minimalist design of the Apple iPad, the packaging of the Surface will also appeal to you.  The surface comes in a beautiful black and white angled box.  As you open it, you realize the inside box is split into two pieces.  The bottom piece contains the Surface cover, which is also a full sized flat keyboard.  The keyboard cover that comes with the Surface has slightly raised edges and raised bumps on the F and J keys.  Many reviewers have commented about how ingenious it is to have a cover that’s also a keyboard, but the even more remarkable aspect of the keyboard is that it also has a mouse pad built in.  This allows you use the Surface as either a normal tablet, just like an iPad or Android tablet, or to use it just like you’d use your PC.  You’ll also notice that the keyboard has keys that are specific to Windows 8 and it also has all the normal function keys (F1 – F12), as well as page up, page down, end, home, and arrow keys.  Volume, screen brightness search, flip, and settings buttons are also provided, to make it easy to switch between apps and control the settings of your Surface Tablet PC using only the keyboard.

In addition to the standard, flat, touch keyboard that comes with the Surface, which, by the way, comes in several different colors, you can also choose the Surface Type Keyboard Cover.  The Type Keyboard is slightly thicker, by a couple of millimeters, barely noticeable, really, and instead of having flat keys, it has a full normal, push-button-style keyboard, just like what’s on most laptops.  So if you’re a touch typist and need to “feel” the keys, this is an amazing choice.  Jut like the flat keyboard, the touch keyboard also doubles as the Surface cover.  The back of both keyboard covers is a sort of soft suede or felt-like material.  I tried both keyboards and just fell in love with the Type Cover keyboard.  Both keyboards are strongly magnetized. The bottom of the Surface is grooved, so the keyboards just “snap” into place once you bring them close to each other.

Once unwrapped, the Surface is pretty striking with it’s sleek black surface and angled, beveled edges.  It has a really nice feel, as you hold it.  It’s feels slightly lighter than an iPad 2, but a bit thicker.  It has just the right amount of space around the edges making it very comfortable to hold in the same manner of holding a book.

  The main reason the Surface is thicker than an iPad and the Galaxy Tab, is that it has a full sized, normal USB Port on the right side of the device, along with a mini HD video port.  At first, I thought this was not an optimal design element, even though it felt good in my hands, and thought Microsoft maybe, should have gone with a thinner version and not included the port.  But that we before I started using the Surface.  After using it, I soon realized how smart the USB port really was.  If one stops thinking of the Surface as a tablet, and starts thinking of it as a new type of PC, then you ask yourself, what PC wouldn’t have a USB port on it to allow for transferring files to a thumb drive, etc.?  Also, as I got used to the thickness, I actually found it easer and more relaxing to hold than either the iPad or the Galaxy Tab.  The thinness of those tablets actually makes you strain your fingers to hold it, especially the iPad, because of it’s thinness and it’s extra weight.  The thickness of the Surface is similar to that of a thicker magazine, such as Harvard Business Review, or a small booklet, and is quite natural to hold, even with the keyboard cover folded back.

As soon as you boot up the Microsoft Surface, you immediately notice a difference.  The Surface calls itself a PC, not a tablet.  And you soon realize why.  The Surface doesn’t have a normal, scaled down, operating system on it, it has Windows 8.  Granted, it’s Windows 8 RT, which means you don’t have the ability to run all your normal Windows applications such as Photoshop, or your line of business (LOB) applications, but it does have all of the features and options of a full Windows 8 operating system, including the desktop, Windows File Explorer, and even the control panel.  A full featured, desktop version

of Microsoft Office 2013 is also included with Surface. The desktop includes Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Internet Explorer, and Windows Explorer.  And because it’s windows, it automatically sees all the printers and other computers on your network.  Within minutes of turning the Surface on for the first time, I was able to open up Excel and Word, and pull up documents from my laptop computer and begin working on them.  The Surface allowed me to seamlessly open and save document to and from my laptop computer.  The other interesting thing about Windows 8, that I think Microsoft really got right, is the synchronization between devices.  Since I’ve been using Windows 8 for about a month on my laptop computer, I already had a number of my settings configured and my desktop background set as well a several preferences.  I even had a number of Windows Store Apps installed on my laptop.  So after I got through the initial Surface setup, it immediately began synchronizing all my settings and preferences to what I had setup on my laptop.  Within about 2 minutes, my Surface tablet looked and felt like my laptop, and was ready to go, without me having to do anything.

We do a lot of data analytics for our clients, so I was curious what would happen if I opened up an Excel workbook with embedded connections to SQL Server Analysis Services, that contained Pivot Tables and Pivot Charts.  I didn’t actually expect this work, but I thought I’d give it a try anyway.  I was so shocked when I opened up the pivot table tab in the spreadsheet and started dragging and dropping and slicing and dicing the data around, right from my Surface Tablet.  All the data connection settings were in tact, and nothing had to be done for the spreadsheet to work.  I just opened it up and started working on it.  It was an amazing experience to be able to do something like on a tablet PC.  The built in OneNote application allowed me to take a screen shot of my Excel spreadsheet running a pivot table on the Surface.

After I got over the shock, I thought to myself, what else could I do with this thing?  So I looked for an app in the Microsoft Store for remote desktop.  I quickly found it and installed it to my Surface.  I ran the app and was able to connect to my desktop and remotely log in and work directly on my laptop through my Surface tablet.   I know you can do the same thing using Android and the iPad, but the experience on the Surface was just completely seamless.  By having the full keyboard, the mouse pad, and being able to seamlessly use the touch screen on the Surface, I soon forgot I was even using on a tablet at all.  Everything from the resolution of the Surface screen, to the keyboard, to the fully functional and integrated short-cut keys, was just perfect.

The last thing I tried was printing.  I opened up a Microsoft Word Document on the Surface, from a file I had on my laptop.  I hit the print button and a list of available printers popped up.  I selected an HP color laser printer and clicked print.  That was it.  There was no setup.  No print driver installation.  No configuration.  Just print.

For the first time since the iPad was introduced, I can finally see a personal replacement device for my desktop and laptop computer.  To say the Microsoft Surface and Windows 8 is a game changer, is so obvious, that it’s almost not worth saying.  The Surface PC, don’t call it a tablet, is nearly everything you need in a device, combined into one.  Microsoft really did this thing right.  It sends a clear message to all the hardware vendors and to Microsoft’s competitors, that the PC is not dead, it’s just arrived, and it’s called the Surface!

 
 

Tags: , , , , , ,

 

a blog by Bryant Avey

Bamboo Innovator

R.E.S.-ilience in Value Creation 《竹经:经商经世离不得立根创新》

On Purpose Magazine

Inspiring, Educational, Enlightening and Entertaining Content of Value

Wordament

The real-time, continuous word tournament!

Ricky's Bing Maps Blog

A blog focused on developing applications with Bing Maps

a blog by Bryant Avey

JJ's Blog

Microsoft Business Intelligence and SharePoint in Action

SQL Server Rider

Database, SSIS, SSAS, SSRS, PowerPivot, Spatial

Nishant Rana's Weblog

Everything related to Microsoft .NET technology

Jimblog

SharePoint, ProjectServer and Microsoft Platform

Connection Agent

What do you need? Ask Steve!

Choiceology Blog

Just another WordPress.com weblog

Tales from the IT Side

Understanding SharePoint and how it interacts with your organization

Reckless Abandon

...with all your heart, soul, mind, and strength

FoodPress

Serving up the hottest dishes on WordPress.com.

Clayton's SharePoint Madness

All About SharePoint, InfoPath, and SharePoint Designer!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,774 other followers

%d bloggers like this: